National Ergonomics Conference & ErgoExpo™ REGISTER AGENDASESSIONS
[2016 Program Materials & Attendee List]
REGISTER AGENDA
Breakout Sessions
For Agenda At-A-Glance click here.
Register for a Premium Pass to attend these workshops.
Tuesday, Nov. 15
9 - 11:30 a.m.

WS1 Drive Your Office Ergonomics Program

Mike Hoonhorst, Senior Consultant, Humantech  

Intermediate

Implementing a sustainable program may seem daunting, but it doesn’t have to be. Research shows 95% of people are able to fix their own workspace if trained in ergonomics principles and if given the right tools. Engaging employees to participate increases buy-in from management, which is often the key factor in ensuring success. Mr. Hoonhorst will teach you how to effectively and systematically manage an office ergonomics program and what it takes to drive a program to success.
[ Workshop ]
takeaways
Design, implement and sustain an effective ergonomics process
Explain how ergonomics training styles can promote or discourage learning
Develop strategies to engage employees in the process
Tuesday, Nov. 15
9 - 11:30 a.m.

WS2 Anatomy for Ergonomists

Dr. Mark Vettraino, Director, Task Group International

Basic

Dr. Vettraino will start out with a basic anatomy and physiology class that will provide the foundation of a solid ergonomics program. He’ll help you understand discomfort, and outline a three-level, proven methodology which will enable you to move from “reactive” to “proactive” with less time and effort. You’ll hear case studies from Fortune 500 companies to demonstrate a simple format of evaluation, documentation, reporting and recommendations, which include working with doctors’ notes and problematic cases.
[ Workshop ]
takeaways
Identify ergonomic issues in the infantile stage
Provide examples on how to mitigate risk while spending little or no money
Create a simple format document and follow up with cases
Tuesday, Nov. 15
9 - 11:30 a.m.

WS3 Advanced Data Collection and Wearable Technology

Rachel Michael, CPE, CHSP, Ergonomics Thought Leadership, Aon Risk Solutions  

Advanced

The wearable device market is booming, and the latest technology is allowing us to collect more real-time data on worker conditions. Ms. Michael will discuss how to use data gathered from wearable EMG, force and goniometry collection. You’ll walk through case studies and learn the important steps for collecting and using data to make future design decisions.
[ Workshop ]
takeaways
Describe the current status of wearable technology data collection
Identify available guidelines for comparison after data collection
Determine issues to consider when gathering data from wearable technology
Tuesday, Nov. 15
9 - 11:30 a.m.

WS4 Industrial Ergonomics 101: Find It, Fix It, Check for Success  Annual Favorite

Jeff Sanford, Director of Consulting, Humantech

Basic

Learn the tools needed to kick-start your ergonomics process! Industrial work environments vary — from repetitive assembly environments, to non-standard field services and distribution centers. You’ll hear how to use qualitative tools to evaluate all of these work areas and to design simple changes to maintain a healthy workforce. And, you’ll learn how to use the “Find It, Fix It, Check for Success” approach to identify problematic job tasks.
[ Workshop ]
takeaways
Learn how ergonomics impact business and organizations
Know how primary risk factors contribute to work-related musculoskeletal disorders
Develop strategies to fix specific ergonomic issues
Tuesday, Nov. 15
9 - 11:30 a.m.

WS5 Reducing Materials Handling Injuries: A Prerequisite for World-Class Safety

Tim McGlothlin, MS, CPE, Executive Director, The Ergonomics Center, North Carolina State University   
Heather White, MIE, CPE, Senior Ergonomist, The Ergonomics Center, North Carolina State University   

Intermediate

Lifting. Pushing. Pulling. Holding. Carrying. Each of these manual materials handling tasks could lead to overexertion, which is a leading cause of disabling injuries at work — accounting for nearly a quarter of all injuries. Before a company can be truly world-class, it must identify and reduce this MMH challenge. Mr. McGlothlin and Ms. White will explain how to evaluate the effectiveness of potential solutions prior to implementation. You’ll leave with instructional manuals and basic software.
[ Workshop ]
takeaways
Identify the risk factors and biomechanics that contribute to MMH injuries
Use NIOSH and Liberty Mutual guidelines to evaluate and reduce risk factors
Apply engineering and administrative controls to reduce the potential of MMH injuries
Tuesday, Nov. 15
1:15 - 3:45 p.m.

WS6 From RULA to REBA to Resilience: An Ergonomic Journey

Dr. Lynn McAtamney, PhD, CPE APAM, Director of Ergonomics, ATUNE Health Centres, Australia

Advanced

Are you already familiar with Rapid Upper Limb Disorders Assessment (RULA) and Rapid Entire Body Assessment (REBA) tools? If so, this workshop is for you. Dr. McAtamney will explore how a practitioner assesses other non-physical risks that are present and how they influence health behavior changes in the workplace. You’ll take a close look at evaluations of psychosocial and mental health risk factors
[ Workshop ]
takeaways
Maintain sensitivity and confidentiality in the workplace
Identify tools beyond RULA and REBA that can assist in broader ergonomic profiling
Evaluate risk factors that impact worker resilience
Tuesday, Nov. 15
1:15 - 3:45 p.m.

WS7 The Aging Worker: Ergonomics and Wellness Interventions for Maximizing Productivity

Richard Bunch, PhD, CEO, WorkSaver Systems

All Levels

Current studies concur: There are many benefits to hiring and maintaining experienced, older workers. However, physiological changes related to aging can contribute to both higher medical payments per claim and fatality rates. Dr. Bunch will share methods of training and stress reduction that have resulted in improved mental performance and reduced errors. You’ll leave with strategies for matching the physical capacities of the older worker to the job, and reducing the risk of injury and illness among the aging workforce.
[ Workshop ]
takeaways
Identify physiological changes that occur with age
Provide accommodations for common age-related illnesses
Recognize wellness interventions that improve cognitive function, balance, reaction times, strength, endurance and flexibility
Tuesday, Nov. 15
1:15 - 3:45 p.m.

WS8 Ergonomic Product Performance Specifications: Selecting the Best Equipment

Kevin Costello, CPE, President, United States Ergonomics   

All Levels

Ensure your tools are appropriate for the job before you introduce them to the workplace. You’ll learn practical methods for assessing equipment, as well as how to apply ergonomic performance specifications to quantify and compare products. Mr. Costello will also review human performance thresholds and biometric principles and lead a discussion on case studies involving a range of industrial and non-industrial tools and equipment.
[ Workshop ]
takeaways
Identify appropriate performance needs for your workplace
Develop ergonomic purchasing processes and specifications
Recognize what to ask your vendors when considering new products
Tuesday, Nov. 15
1:15 - 3:45 p.m.

WS9 Industrial Ergonomics 201: The Job Improvement Process   Annual Favorite

Jeff Sanford, Director of Consulting, Humantech   

Intermediate

Build on what you learned in the morning workshop, “Industrial Ergonomics 101: Find It, Fix It, Check for Success.” Mr. Sanford will demonstrate how a set of quantitative tools can help you evaluate industrial work areas and design effective countermeasures to reduce ergonomic risk factors and shape a productive work environment. You’ll leave with the necessary tools and methods to drive an ergonomics process based on risk assessment.
[ Workshop ]
takeaways
Identify examples of how ergonomics impacts your bottom line
Quantify musculoskeletal disorder risk in the workplace
Recognize practical solutions to design better workstations and work processes
Tuesday, Nov. 15
1:15 - 3:45 p.m.

WS10 Fitting the Job to Advance Worker Well-Being

Chia-Chia Chang, MPH, MBA, Partnerships Coordinator, NIOSH Total Worker Health®, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Sara L. Tamers, PhD, MPH, Coordinator of Research Program Development and Collaboration, NIOSH Total Worker Health®, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Basic

There is growing interest in an integrated, holistic approach to worker safety and health. Ms. Chang and Dr. Tamers will explain why Total Worker Health® means policies, programs and practices that integrate protection from work-related hazards while advancing worker well-being. Learn how you can improve the wellbeing of your workforce by addressing issues such as safety, physical and mental health, compensation & benefits, and healthy supervision.
[ Workshop ]
takeaways
Explain how work impacts employee well-being directly and indirectly
Discuss the rationale for an integrated approach
Share strategies to improve worker safety and health
Wednesday, Nov. 16
8:30 - 9:30 a.m.

PM1 Keys to Successfully Managing a Global Ergonomics Program at ZF TRW

Raymond Higgs, Regional HS&E Manager, ZF TRW
Deepesh Desai, Director of Consulting, Humantech   

Intermediate

ZF TRW, a primary developer of automotive safety systems and services, has facilities in more than 20 countries, including 22 technical centers and 13 test tracks. With that footprint, not only are there challenges to effectively and consistently roll out an ergonomics process but also to sustain and enhance it over time. Mr. Higgs will share experiences, lessons learned and key components to successfully implement, enhance and manage a global ergonomics program. You’ll learn how to engage leadership, and use the best methods and tools to develop an enterprise-wide ergonomics infrastructure.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Understand effective metrics for driving and tracking progress
Recognize the role of technology in process deployment
Apply proven strategies to sustain your ergonomics process
Wednesday, Nov. 16
1 - 2 p.m.

PM2 The Progression of Wells Fargo’s Office Ergonomics Process

LaQuandra Jones, Loss Prevention Specialist, Wells Fargo
Tony Silva, Atlas Injury Prevention Solutions

Basic

Implementing a sustainable office ergonomics process is especially challenging for a company as large and geographically dispersed as Wells Fargo, with more than 280,000 team members in over 9,000 locations. Ms. Jones will take you through the organization’s tiered approach, which is based upon the risk and needs of the work associate. You’ll leave with ideas to address the ergonomic challenges of a rapidly changing workplace, whether it’s hoteling or sit/stand stations.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Minimize errors in the ergonomics recommendation process
Determine the need for face-to-face intervention
Integrate your strategy with a feedback/check loop process to verify issues have been addressed
Wednesday, Nov. 16
2:15 - 3:15 p.m.

PM3 Launching a Successful Ergonomics Initiative Across Multiple Facilities

David Wein, Director, Corporate Safety & Ergonomics, Oshkosh   

Intermediate

Oshkosh implemented its ergonomics program several years ago and has since seen a dramatic reduction in musculoskeletal and soft tissue injuries. Along the way, it identified the key principles to successfully implementing an ergonomics program. See how Oshkosh got employees actively engaged in ergonomic improvements, process and manufacturing engineers driving ergo improvements in their areas, and safety/ergo professionals participating in design reviews during new product development. Mr. Wein will share the tools you need to start or strengthen your organization’s ergonomics initiatives.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify ways to reduce musculoskeletal injuries
Re-evaluate the steps in your ergonomics program
Build employee engagement and engineering involvement in your ergonomics process
Wednesday, Nov. 16
4 - 5 p.m.

PM4 Program Auditing: Using Metrics to Drive Success

Moon Mukkar-Poyser, , B.Sc., R. Kin, Corporate Ergonomist, Cargill, Inc.

Intermediate

If you do not measure it, it will not be done. If you measure it correctly, it will be done well. This is the philosophy Cargill, Inc. used to develop an auditing process for its ergonomics program. Ms. Mukkar Poyser will walk you through the evolution of Cargill’s program and the positive effects it has had company-wide. You’ll discover the process, tools and metrics you can use to drive success in your organization.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify the metrics that will drive key outcomes for your ergonomics program
Develop a systematic method for measuring progress and auditing a program
Define what constitutes a holistic view of success for ergonomics
Thursday, Nov. 17
10:45 - 11:45 a.m.

PM5 Cream of the Crop: Implementing a Proactive Ergonomics System

Vicki Froman, Workers’ Compensation Manager, Rich Products
Tony Silva, Director, Atlas Injury Prevention Solutions

Basic

Hear how Rich Products, a leading supplier and solutions provider to foodservice, in-store bakery and retail marketplaces, improved ergonomics at its North American facilities. The new proactive, sustainable ergonomics system focuses on ergonomic risk assessment, measuring the physical demands of tasks and identifying essential functions of jobs to be used for ADA-compliant job descriptions. Ms. Froman will explain how Rich’s 90-day pilot program, which was later implemented company-wide, set out to increase the organization’s focus and knowledge of ergonomics.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Properly define a job so completing a site-wide baseline assessment is feasible and meaningful
Leverage technology to capture data and complete analysis in real time
Prioritize and track ergonomic fixes through evaluation and software analysis
Thursday, Nov. 17
1:45 - 2:45 p.m.

PM6 Benchmarking Your Ergonomics Program

Scott Smith, Director of Ergonomics, Global Risk Consulting, Aon   

Intermediate

Do you have a world-class ergonomics program? This is a tough question to answer — unless you have the right benchmark. You’ll learn why benchmarking your ergonomics program is an important step in its growth, and realize the potential return on investment when you move toward world class. Mr. Smith will discuss the state of ergonomics programs giving you key insights on the metrics companies use to measure success and how these metrics improve program effectiveness from both a tactical and strategic perspective.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Review internal and external considerations for benchmarks
Recognize measures of known world-class programs
Use Six Sigma to measure program success
Thursday, Nov. 17
3 - 4 p.m.

PM7 Establishing an Effective Ergonomics Program

Brian Farnes, Safety Supervisor, Nintendo of America
Vanessa Hudson, Safety & Health Specialist, Nintendo of America

Basic

Learn how Nintendo of America has developed and grown its in-house ergonomics program to effectively address sprain/strain and musculoskeletal injuries across all areas of the organization, including office, warehousing and production environments. You’ll receive an overview of the tools and resources Nintendo uses, with guidance on how to tailor them for your organization.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Create an effective in-house ergonomics program or revitalize an existing one
Recruit and train the right members for your ergonomics team
Identify where employee training or intervention is needed
Thursday, Nov. 17
4:15 - 5:15 p.m.

PM8 Cargill’s Continuous Improvement in Injury Prevention

David Brodie, MS, CPE, Corporate Ergonomist, Cargill, Inc.   
Tony Silva, Director, Atlas Injury Prevention Solutions

Intermediate

Over the years, Cargill Meat Solutions has continuously sought to improve its ergonomic process. Recently, it took those efforts to a higher, more proactive level. Mr. Brodie will explain how Cargill used Six Sigma and Usability methodologies to determine the validity of internally developed risk assessment tools, and optimize the web-based software system that is the backbone of program data and analysis.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Reduce data collection and input time
Improve human-computer interaction of the web-based software system
Accurately predict the likelihood of a musculoskeletal disorder
Friday, Nov. 18
8:30 - 9:30 a.m.

PM9 Applying ISO 45001 to Manage Your Workplace Ergonomics Program

James Mallon, Executive Vice President, Humantech   
Walt Rostykus, Principal Consultant, Humantech   

Intermediate

Most ergonomics programs are modeled after common business processes. The new ISO 45001 safety management system standard, to be published this fall, provides another excellent model for improving your ergonomics process. Mr. Mallon and Mr. Rostykus will provide real industry applications and examples to show how the key elements of an ergonomics improvement process align with ISO 45001. You’ll hear the dos and don’ts already learned by other organizations leading the way.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Evaluate and align your ergonomics program to ISO 45001
Identify techniques and tips for effective implementation
Recognize and avoid challenges implementing and sustaining your management system
Friday, Nov. 18
9:45 - 10:45 a.m.

PM10 Johnson & Johnson: A National Office Ergonomics Case Study

Danie Tan, MS, CIH, CSP – Senior EH&S Engineer, Johnson & Johnson
Ron Marquez, Business Development Manager, Briotix

Basic

To deliver such a broad coverage of widely respected brands, Johnson & Johnson maintains facilities in several states. Through a continuous improvement process, J&J has identified technology tools and processes that allow its teams to proactively identify and support employees. Learn how J&J, using a combination of resources from Environmental Health and Safety, and Global Health Services, has been able to reduce risk and increase productivity of its national workforce and how you can too.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify and test technology tools
Develop a workflow for involving multiple stakeholders
Communicate plans for employee adoption and engagement
Wednesday, Nov. 16
8:30 - 9:30 a.m.

OF1 Using Body Postures to Adjust Office Workstations

Stacy Rozell, Safety and Environmental Specialist, Southern California Edison

Basic

Focusing on neutral postures and equipment used at computer workstations, Ms. Rozell will discuss employee movement capabilities awareness and how to strategize work methods based on employee range of motion as well as how to enhance that range.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Adjust a workstation based on neutral postures
Modify workstations when there are limited resources available
Review employee movements at the workstation
Wednesday, Nov. 16
1 - 2 p.m.

OF2 Large Touchscreens: Are They the Magic Bullet?

Laura Parnell, Ergonomic Advisor, Exxon Mobil Corporation
Cynthia Purvis Roe, Ergonomic Specialist, M-erg

Intermediate

In recent years, geoscientists have been using large touchscreens based on the theory that they reduce or eliminate discomfort and MSD risks in click-intensive programs while increasing task productivity and satisfaction. Ms. Parnell and Ms. Purvis Roe will unveil surprising new ergonomic research from a field study conducted at a major oil and gas company. And they’ll delve into recommendations for “young-eyed” display users as well as those wearing multifocal lenses.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Describe how a touchscreen can reduce or eliminate discomfort, and improve productivity
Explain why a high percentage of computer users report eye discomfort, and pain and stiffness in their neck
Discuss how to place a touchscreen to reduce or eliminate non-neutral postures and visual issues
Wednesday, Nov. 16
2:15 - 3:15 p.m.

OF3 The Confusing World of Ergonomic Chairs

Alan Hedge, PhD, CPE, CErgHF, Professor of Ergonomics, Cornell University   

Intermediate

Since the launch of the first ergonomic chair in the early 1970s the number of alternative designs has exploded. Today ergonomists and users are faced with myriad — and confusing — options. Unlike computer design and smart phones, where usability and simplicity have driven ergonomic design, the engineers who design task chairs have increased the number of controls, as well as their complexity. Dr. Hedge will address what users know and don’t know about their chairs and identify features essential to an ergonomic task chair.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Recognize the requirements for a task chair to have an ergonomic design
Explain how the complexity of chair control design impacts chair usability
Connect the complexity of chair controls to reports of musculoskeletal discomfort
Wednesday, Nov. 16
4 - 5 p.m.

OF4 Designing for the Office of Tomorrow

Mike Hoonhorst, Senior Consultant, Humantech   

Advanced

Where and how people work have drastically changed in the last decade. The standard 9 to 5 workday is no longer the norm. The mobile worker population has more than tripled, turning coffee shops, hotel lobbies, airports, cars and, of course, the home into peripheral office spaces. These changes require organizations to reinvent work practices and work spaces to better fit the needs of employees. Managing office ergonomics today may be more complex, but that doesn’t mean it’s more difficult. Mr. Hoonhorst will explain how to assess and adjust workspaces regardless of their location.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify basic principles of managing and implementing an office ergonomics process
Recognize the value and return of implementing different ergonomics training methods
Develop an awareness of current trends in office design
Thursday, Nov. 17
10:45 - 11:45 a.m.

OF5 My Chair Is Plotting to Kill Me

Emma Christensen, Corporate Ergonomist, WorksafeBC
Gina Vahlas, CCPE, Ergonomist, WorksafeBC


Basic

You’ve probably heard that prolonged sitting is a killer, but what’s the solution? Stand all day? Throw a bunch of money into height-adjustable furniture? Come find out what makes sitting so dangerous, and what you can do to reduce the risks. Ms. Christensen and Ms. Vahlas will review how to set up a workstation to minimize risk factors, and share user-friendly tips to implement changes at your own workplace. You’ll learn how to choose the right height-adjustable workstation, prioritize who needs one and control costs.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify the pros and cons of sitting and standing
Explain how employees can incorporate more movement into their day
Think creatively to achieve a healthy posture that suits each unique work style
Thursday, Nov. 17
1:45 - 2:45 p.m.

OF6 Neutral or Awkward: The Many Postures of the Modern Office

David Hodge, Ergonomics Specialist, M-erg
Thomas Rowell, Ergonomics Specialist, M-erg
  

Basic

Mr. Hodge and Mr. Rowell will examine the many variations of postures found in today’s office work environment, beginning with the neutral posture, a sound starting point for building an enterprise ergonomics program. You’ll gain answers to these questions: Should employees be required to stay in neutral posture? What is the impact of staying in problematic postures? How can employees be encouraged to move more often? What is the benefit of movement versus static posture? What should the goal be for employees and their posture? How do we help employees easily meet those goals?
[ Session ]
takeaways
Demonstrate how neutral posture can be used in sitting, standing and leaning while working at a variety of computer work stations
Incorporate neutral posture into the typical office environment
Identify common causes of problem postures and offer simple solutions to encourage neutral posture
Thursday, Nov. 17
3 - 4 p.m.

OF7 Digital Eyestrain in the Workplace: A Site for Sore Eyes

Jeffrey Anshel, OD, FAAO, Founder, Corporate Vision Consulting

Basic

Viewing digital images is a way of life these days. But how does it differ from looking at printed text? Are we risking eye health and visual stress issues in our employees? Surveys show that up to 88% of those working with computers cite eyestrain as their top complaint. Dr. Anshel will explain how to assess the visual needs of your computer-using employees, and provide them with computer lenses and environmental recommendations.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Discuss how the visual system functions in the workplace
Detect workplace conditions that can lead to potential eyestrain
Set up office workspaces to minimize eyestrain and improve employee productivity
Thursday, Nov. 17
4:15 - 5:15 p.m.

OF8 The Future of Sit/Stand

Rick Spencer, Head of Prevention and Optimization, Briotix

Intermediate

Most employees have heard the warnings about prolonged sitting. Organizations have responded in different ways. Some limit solutions to those with physician notes, while other organizations offer height adjustable workstations to all. Although the data on reduced facility expenses with height adjustable workstations is well documented, we’re still waiting for evidence on the health impacts on employees. And we’re still waiting for data that proves employees change their behavior when provided the option to change their posture. Join Mr. Spencer as he explores the past, present and future of the sit/stand movement.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Review data on sedentary lifestyles and how it impacts corporate messaging
Discuss protocols that move beyond a requirement of medical notes
Identify technology and wearable trends and discuss how they impact sit/stand adoption
Friday, Nov. 18
8:30 - 9:30 a.m.

OF9 Telehealth Ergonomics Assessments Link Remote Sites With Trained Professionals

Linda Miller, President, EWI Works   
Catherine Smallman, Senior Ergonomist, EWI Works

Advanced

Telehealth ergonomics assessments hold great potential to improve service delivery in rural and remote settings. Ms. Miller and Ms. Smallman will discuss the importance of live real-time video conferencing to improve communication, attain key assessment information and demonstrate ergonomic adjustments. They’ll also discuss key considerations, such as bandwidth and hardware capabilities. You’ll leave with communication strategies to improve rapport, maintain employee confidentiality and reduce anxiety around telehealth ergonomics assessments.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Develop a successful approach to delivering telehealth ergonomics assessments
Provide a cost-benefits analysis for the delivery of telehealth assessments for rural or remote settings
Create a checklist that prepares both the client and ergonomist for the telehealth assessment
Friday, Nov. 18
9:45 - 10:45 a.m.

OF10 5 Keys to Successful Ergonomics Outcomes

Kathryn Meeks, PT DPT CAE, Founder and Owner, Optimizing Motion
Suzanne Patenaude, PT MA CIE, President, Patenaude & Associates, Inc.

Intermediate

As providers of on-site physical therapy who strive for quick resolution and minimal lost time, Ms. Meeks and Ms. Patenaude know the risks of failing to quickly identify the ergonomic injury source. Based on their experiences, they have identified the six common causes of ergonomic injuries which accounted for 95% of their case load. Soon their customers recognized the recurring common signs, symptoms and solutions, and began to request training to reduce injury rates. Hear what they learned along the way, which you can use to boost your own ergonomics programs.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify five tools that lead to successful outcomes
Determine fundamental solutions to ergonomic challenges
Apply ergonomic principles to resolve common discomforts
Wednesday, Nov. 16
8:30 - 9:30 a.m.

IW1 Legal Considerations of Pre-Work Screening

Drew Bossen, Executive Vice President, Atlas Injury Prevention Solutions
Albert Lee, Employment and Labor Law Attorney, Tucker Arensberg, P.C.
Mary Kate Teske, Director of Human Resources, Prompt Ambulance Service

Intermediate

Organizations are increasingly using pre-work screen processes to verify that prospective hires have the physical ability to perform the job. Mr. Bossen, Mr. Lee and Ms. Teske will identify the issues you should be aware of when considering, designing, testing and implementing a pre-work screen and/or a return-to-work screen process. Case studies will demonstrate the importance of understanding the legal risks, and illustrate real-world positive outcomes and consequences. You’ll leave with a working knowledge of the screening process and how to consider implementing one within your organization.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Explain how the law differs on pre-offer and post-offer pre-work screens
Discuss legal risk factors in developing and implementing pre-work screens
Reduce legal risks associated with selection, reliability, validity and disparate impact
Wednesday, Nov. 16
1 - 2 p.m.

IW2 Extreme Ergonomics as a Return-to-Work or Stay-at-Work Tool

Ian Chong, MS, CPE, Extreme Ergonomics Inc.   

Intermediate

Ergonomics is an underused tool for addressing and closing difficult or severe injury cases, or disability management/return-to-work scenarios. With real-case examples, out-of-the-box thinking and logical methods, Mr. Chong will illustrate extreme ergonomics applications to specific return-to-work issues for industry workers, police officers, construction workers, materials handlers, utility workers and others.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Use high-level ergonomic solutions to manage disability, address injuries and return employees to work
Develop a logical approach to implement ergonomics in a wide array of scenarios
Discuss the impact ergonomics can have on challenging RTW cases
Wednesday, Nov. 16
2:15 - 3:15 p.m.

IW3 Transform Ergonomics With Innovative Assessment Screening

Michael Gee, Owner, PRO FIT Ergonomic Solutions Inc.

Basic

Ergonomic risk factors have long been blamed for WMSDs. Regardless of attempts to reduce awkward postures, excessive forces and repetitive motions, many employees still suffer from some level of discomfort or pain, particularly in industrial workplaces. Mr. Gee will discuss the gaps in information obtained from traditional ergonomic assessments and provide a detailed description of human function and biomechanics. Plus, he’ll instruct you on how to assess function movement in your employees using an innovative assessment model.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify the true causations for most WMSDs
Apply the objective functional assessment screen and the corrective strategies
Create self-assessment approaches that can be delivered company-wide
Wednesday, Nov. 16
4 - 5 p.m.

IW4 Innovation, Intervention and Impact: Best Practices in Ergo Task Analysis

Connie Miller, CCM, CDMS, CPE, Vice President, Business Development, BTE Workforce Solutions
Robert Lisson, Vice President, Employer Services, On Site Therapy, LLC

Intermediate

Safe work is critical to reducing OSHA recordables and injury costs. Evaluating how the job is performed and understanding the ergonomic risk factors in tasks is a component of every good ergonomic analysis. But how do you quantify the success of your analysis? How can jobs be improved from a safe work performance view and still meet production requirements? Enter MODAPTS, otherwise known as MODular Arrangement of Pre-determined Time Standards. Ms. Herndon and Mr. Lisson will explain how to integrate MODAPTS with your ergonomic task analysis. You’ll leave with the ability to use this world-recognized system for measuring production.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Define the objective of MODAPTS
Identify emerging best practices in work task analysis
Understand the value of objective task measurement and MODAPTS applications
Thursday, Nov. 17
10:45 - 11:45 a.m.

IW5 Fit-for-Duty Testing Programs: Overcoming the Legal Hurdles

Richard Bunch, PhD, CEO, WorkSaver Systems

Intermediate

Disability. Health information privacy. Leave entitlement. Compliance with these regulations has led to misconceptions that fit-for-duty tests for new hires and return-to-work cases create insurmountable legal hurdles. Nothing can be further from the truth. Relying on his vast experience with the design and administration of FFD programs, Dr. Bunch will present the specific methodologies that are needed to ensure that a fit-for-duty program is both highly effective and in full compliance with employment and health privacy laws.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Recognize proper timing and method of obtaining medical and disability information
Create an effective and legally compliant FFD program
Explain the interactive accommodation review process and related role of ergonomics
Thursday, Nov. 17
1:45 - 2:45 p.m.

IW6 Mitigate the Top Reasons for MSDs in a Manufacturing Workplace

Kathryn Meeks, PT, DPT, CAE, Founder and Owner, Optimizing Motion
Suzanne Patenaude, PT, MA, CIE, President, Patenaude & Associates, Inc.

Basic

What do you have when six recurring injuries account for approximately 95% of a facility’s case load? An opportunity. And, when you have management support, you have an immediate opportunity! Ms. Meeks and Ms. Patenaude will review a case study from a manufacturing facility where a training-based solution was used successfully to rapidly drive down injury rates. From observations, solutions and outcome measurements, you’ll learn about six common work practice causes for ergonomic injury and strategies to limit them.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify six of the most common work practice risk factors
Develop unique tracking options
Apply optimized motion to bridge engineering and ergonomic solutions
Thursday, Nov. 17
3 - 4 p.m.

IW7 Ergonomics Incident Investigations: Methods and Tools to Improve Outcomes

Jessica Ellison, M.S., CPE, CSP, Principal Consultant, BSI EHS Services and Solutions   

Intermediate

Lean planning can influence change within an organization to reduce ergonomics injuries resulting from manual materials handling tasks. Find out about all the Lean techniques, tools and diagrams you can employ to drive improvement and conduct incident investigations. Ms. Ellison will demonstrate how to apply Lean thinking to common ergonomics problems.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Write a defined problem statement with examples
Explain your current state with Lean tools and diagram types
Conduct a root cause analysis, and develop and track action plans
Thursday, Nov. 17
4:15 - 5:15 p.m.

IW8 Early Intervention Programs: Knowing and Understanding the Boundaries

Drew Bossen, Executive Vice President, Atlas Injury Prevention Solutions
Curt DeWeese, PT, COO, DSI Work Solutions
Scott Ege, PT, MS, President, Ege WorkSmart Solutions, PC

Intermediate

At last year’s conference, these panelists provided a robust presentation on a then-recent meeting and dialogue with OSHA regarding early intervention/injury triage programs. The OSHA dialogue continues with recent Letters of Interpretation offering further clarity for organizations to understand, consider and potentially implement these programs. You’ll hear their real-world experiences, including their victories and challenges.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Compare the traditional limitations of first aid and interventional care
Discuss the who, what and where of exercise in the workplace
Explain how soft tissue mobilization can be deployed under the umbrella of first aid to reduce recordable injuries
Friday, Nov. 18
8:30 - 9:30 a.m.

IW9 Metrics Development: Case Studies Showing a Multi-Faceted Approach

Keith Osborne, Ergonomist, Seattle City Light

Intermediate

See how leading and lagging indicator tracking is key to metric development and continued process improvement. Through two case studies from Honeywell Technology Solutions Inc. and Seattle City Light, you’ll hear how using a multi-faceted combination of online assessment tools, one-on-one assessments and targeted training helped cut injury rates, increase productivity and reduce potential injury claims.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Explain how leading and lagging indicators impact the ergonomics process
Build buy-in and management support to further your ergonomics program
Integrate ergonomics and wellness to improve worker performance
Friday, Nov. 18
9:45 - 10:45 a.m.

IW10 High Impact Body Mechanics Training for Field Workers

Scott Ege, PT, MS, President, Ege WorkSmart Solutions, PC
Kevin Kelley, Safety Health & Environmental Manager, Ecolab

Basic

The majority of work performed by Ecolab’s field technicians is in customer locations where there is little to no opportunity to change the work environment or implement engineering controls. Hear about Ecolab’s comprehensive strategy to reduce the risk and prevalence of MSDs specific to field service work and the results achieved. Come ready to move — you’ll actually experience the principles incorporated into Ecolab’s unique approach.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Challenge an employee’s approach to their work from a human factors standpoint
Identify key components of a strategy to reduce the risk of MSDs associated with field service work
Target training and learning experiences for seasoned field service technicians
Wednesday, Nov. 16
8:30 - 9:30 a.m.

IA1 Ergonomics Data — More Than Just Numbers

Chris Shieldsmith, Corporate Ergonomics Leader, Cummins Inc.

Intermediate

Collecting data and understanding specific challenges at multiple sites can be very difficult. Mr. Shieldsmith will share how Cummins collects and uses data to drive improvement in its ergonomics program. Learn what programs Cummins uses, how it collects information and the major challenges it faces as a global company. Plus, you’ll find out how to use information from all levels in the organization to gain buy-in for your ergonomics program.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify potential data streams and understand how internal data provides insight into your ergonomics program
Shift focus from traditional lagging indicators to more proactive leading indicators
Improve data collection within your ergonomics program
Wednesday, Nov. 16
1 - 2 p.m.

IA2 Human Vibration Monitoring and Control

Kevin Costello, CPE, President, United States Ergonomics   

Intermediate

Exposure to whole body and hand-arm vibration is a daily occurrence for millions of workers. The impact can range from no effect to debilitating and irreversible cumulative injury depending on worker technique, environmental conditions, worker health, and the duration and magnitude of the exposure. Mr. Costello will provide you with best practices for controlling the potential impact of vibration on your workforce.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify the health risks associated with vibration exposure
Provide safe limits of exposure
Determine when action is required
Wednesday, Nov. 16
2:15 - 3:15 p.m.

IA3 Practical Solutions for Common Manual Materials Handling Risks

Fred Norton, Technical Director – Ergonomics, Liberty Mutual   
David Jennings, Technical Consultant - Risk Control Services, Liberty Mutual

Basic

Overexertion from manual materials handling is an expensive problem, resulting in more than $15 billion in direct costs. Mr. Norton will demonstrate effective approaches to analyze and reduce the risk factors that contribute to overexertion-related injuries. You’ll hear case studies of innovative solutions in various industries and learn proven methods for manual handling task analysis that have led to development of practical, cost-effective changes in the workplace.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify contributing factors for manual materials handling injuries
Describe how to apply basic task analysis methods to evaluate risk
Discuss how ergonomic principles can be applied to practical changes in the workplace
Wednesday, Nov. 16
4 - 5 p.m.

IA4 Lower Extremity Ergonomics: Mats, Insoles and More

Scott Smith, Director of Ergonomics, Global Risk Consulting, Aon   

Basic

We’ve all heard about the dangers of sitting, but standing and kneeling have long presented challenges in many industries. The issue of static standing or continuous walking is far from resolved, and more products including knee pads, anti-fatigue mats and shoe inserts continue to come into the marketplace touting risk reduction and fatigue prevention. Mr. Smith will wade through the facts and impact of these as solutions, and ask the bigger question of whether (and when) standing is the right answer.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify the root causes and risk factors of lower extremity injuries
Measure the effectiveness of lower extremity solutions using objective and subjective data
Explain how lean manufacturing and ergonomics may differ on work-station changes from sitting to standing
Thursday, Nov. 17
10:45 - 11:45 a.m.

IA5 Risk Factors, Risk Assessments and Your Ergonomics Program

Arun Garg, Professor of Occupational Science & Technology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee   
Jay Kapellusch, Associate Professor, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Intermediate

Get an up-close look at how to set up a successful ergonomics program that improves productivity and decreases injuries, lost workdays and workers’ compensation costs. Using case studies and examples, Mr. Garg and Mr. Kapellusch will discuss evidenced-based risk factors and arm you with the knowledge to perform risk assessments for low back pain and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders. They’ll also share the latest scientific evidence from large-scale epidemiological studies to identify the types of physical exposure risk factors that lead to common occupational injuries such as carpal tunnel syndrome and low back pain.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Understand evidenced-based risk factors for low back pain and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders
Use scientific evidence and proven job analysis methods to reduce injuries and increase productivity
Integrate the latest scientific knowledge and tools to develop a successful ergonomics program
Thursday, Nov. 17
1:45 - 2:45 p.m.

IA6 Maximizing Your Ergonomics and Safety Program With Lean Concepts

Jerome J. Congleton, PhD, PE, CPE, Emeritus Professor of Ergonomics and Safety Engineering, Texas A&M University Health Science Center School of Public Health   

Intermediate

Ergonomics and safety teams can benefit from implementing lean manufacturing. As a system, rather than individual tools and techniques, lean manufacturing can be used in conjunction with ergonomics to increase process effectiveness in service, manufacturing and even administrative functions. Dr. Congleton will emphasize the hands-on application of commonly used lean and ergonomic tools and techniques, so you learn how to use lean concepts to enhance your programs while setting standards, recommending method improvements and establishing metrics to measure success.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Develop a firm understanding of lean manufacturing principles
Recommend method improvements and develop cost/benefit metrics for your organization
Explain how your organization can benefit from a lean process
Thursday, Nov. 17
3 - 4 p.m.

IA7 Prevention Through Design: An Ergonomics Business Case

Georgi Popov, PhD, QEP, CMC, Associate Professor, University of Central Missouri

Intermediate

Dr. Popov will share the Prevention through Design (PtD) process that will give your ergonomics program the tools and metrics needed to develop a business case for change. You’ll see the step-by-step process of risk assessment and risk reduction, as well as the financial analysis that goes into developing a full business case with a PtD intervention.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Describe Prevention through Design methodologies
Identify value factors used to support business decisions
Align health and safety interventions with business goals and objectives
Thursday, Nov. 17
4:15 - 5:15 p.m.

IA8 Two Hands Are Better Than One: How Asymmetric Lifting Can Lead to Injury

John Pentikis, Ergonomist, U.S. Army Public Health Center   

Intermediate

There is no way to accurately determine how much one-hand lifting is taking place in industry. And while many ergonomists believe it’s a common occurrence, there are no well-established one-hand lifting guidelines. The absence of such guidance often results in ergonomists treating one-hand lifts the same as two-hand lifts. Mr. Pentikis will share a recent study, which showed a significant increase in back compressive force when lifting a weight with one hand versus doubling the weight and lifting it with two hands. You’ll leave with an understanding of the biomechanical costs associated with one-hand lifting.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Discuss the value of using both hands during manual materials handling activities
Explain how lifting twice as much weight may be safer on the back
Recognize the impact one-hand lifting has on forces acting on the feet
Friday, Nov. 18
8:30 - 9:30 a.m.

IA9 How Many Is Too Many? Workload Analysis and Controls

Melissa Afterman, Senior Principal Ergonomist, VSI Risk Management & Ergonomics, Inc.   

Intermediate

How long can my employees safely perform this task? How many times can they safely repeat it? These are the million dollar ergonomics questions. Ms. Afterman will share how she developed the correct answers for a large biotech company. After years of high injury rates, setting sample limits for its high-risk testing procedures was in order. Ms. Afterman’s team focused on frequency instead of just number repetitions. You’ll learn the importance of pacing and reducing intensity wherever possible.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify the factors that contribute to risk exposure
Apply the ACGIH Threshold Limit Value for Hand Activity using a simple worksheet
Develop usable guidance for workload scheduling of repetitive procedures
Friday, Nov. 18
9:45 - 10:45 a.m.

IA10 Slips, Trips and Falls: The Integrated Solution

Barry Carlin, CEO, Best Performance Systems, Inc.

Basic

Same-level slips, trips and falls are occupational hazards found in nearly all work settings. Frequently the cause of bruised egos, the more serious side effect is a range of injuries from bruised muscles to broken bones and even death. For U.S. businesses, the result is time off work, temporary employee costs, overtime for existing employees, lost work days and increased workers’ comp costs. Mr. Carlin will review housekeeping, contributory-design factors, facility maintenance, personal clothing and equipment, the aging worker, and more — showing you how to evaluate and implement solutions to limit slip and fall injuries in your workplace.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify sources and contributing factors of slip, trip and fall incidents in your environment
Create an integrated solution to identify and correct all contributing factors
Influence workers to embrace changes
Wednesday, Nov. 16
8:30 - 9:30 a.m.

EE1 Boost Engagement for Your Safety and Ergonomics Programs

Michael Melnik, Owner, Prevention Plus, Inc.

Basic

Ergonomics is about much more than new equipment and engineering controls. While these are critical aspects of a successful ergonomics program, their effectiveness is greatly influenced by the way programs are developed, implemented and sustained. Every step of the way, actions are taken that drive attitudes in directions that either support or undermine the ergonomics process. Mr. Melnik will discuss the “people” portion of the ergonomics process and show you how to make sure that the attitudes being generated create the greatest return on investment for your ergonomics efforts.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify specific behaviors that increase engagement in ergonomics programs
Evaluate the level of engagement during all phases of your ergonomics program
Develop strategies for inviting enthusiasm and minimizing resistance
Wednesday, Nov. 16
1 - 2 p.m.

EE2 Safe Patient Handling and Mobility Program Implementation

Kelsey McCoskey, Ergonomist, Army Public Health Center   

Intermediate

Protecting military and civilian healthcare providers from musculoskeletal injury risk is vitally important to provide the highest standard of care to injured soldiers, retirees and their families. Implementation of safe patient handling and mobility (SPHM) programs can result in decreased injuries, discomfort and lost work time while increasing morale and staff retention. Ms. McCoskey will discuss the successful implementation of a comprehensive SPHM program at the Army Public Health Center, and share specific challenges and lessons learned.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify three issues that drive the need for SPHM standards in medical facilities
Recognize three types of patient handling devices that can be incorporated in future projects
Implement a comprehensive SPHM program
Wednesday, Nov. 16
2:15 - 3:15 p.m.

EE3 The Who, What, When, Where, Why and How of Successful Ergonomics Teams

James Mallon, Executive Vice President, Humantech   
Walt Rostykus, Principal Consultant, Humantech   

Intermediate

World-class ergonomics improvement processes are built on the performance and commitment of wellfunctioning teams. Based on the results of industry benchmarking studies and experience garnered from more than 25 years of consulting, Mr. Mallon and Mr. Rostykus will discuss the five critical elements for engaging teams to plan, deploy and sustain an ergonomics process. You’ll learn the different training requirements needed for a comprehensive ergonomics improvement process.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Recognize the well-defined roles and responsibilities that must be fulfilled
Identify the characteristics and makeup of a successful ergonomics team
Adapt the results of the efforts made by successful ergonomics teams
Wednesday, Nov. 16
4 - 5 p.m.

EE4 The Magic of Competition: Bringing Out the Best in Ergonomic Teams

Arnie Neustaetter, Ergonomics Manager, Pacific Gas & Electric Co.

Basic

A structured competition can generate interest and participation in your ergonomics program. Mr. Neustaetter will describe how PG&E has used annual internal competitions to motivate teams and guide ergonomics interventions year round. Through case studies with results, graphics and video clips, you’ll learn about marketing, competition structure and rules, judging criteria, and awards — so you can get a competition started in your own organization.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Create a competition to drive outcome-oriented interventions
Manage the competitive process from start to finish including marketing, awards and recognition
Identify options to present a less-competitive format to maximize participation
Thursday, Nov. 17
10:45 - 11:45 a.m.

EE5 Ergonomics for Women: Gender-Specific Design Implications and Behavior Change Systems

Dr. Julie Landis, DPT, CEAS, VP of Business Development, Briotix

Basic

Understand from the physical and cognitive viewpoints how ergonomics in office and mobile environments will improve performance and well-being for women. Dr. Landis will focus on gender-specific workstation design implications and the importance of incorporating behavior change, specifically incorporating movement into the day. You’ll discover motivational interviewing methodologies that can guide adoption and behavioral change, as well as health statistics and the trends regarding female workers.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Explain how women use content and tools for behavioral change
Discuss gender differences and their relation to MSDs
Design guidelines for women who fall outside of normative adjustments
Thursday, Nov. 17
1:45 - 2:45 p.m.

EE6 Ergonomics and Millennials

Kathy Espinoza, AVP, Ergonomics & Safety, Keenan & Associates   

Basic

Risk managers have focused much of their attention on the needs of aging employees, while overlooking a potentially more challenging ergonomic conundrum — ergonomics for Millennials. In just a few years, Millennials will make up 75% of the global workforce, and they will enter the workforce having used technology all of their lives with developed patterns and habits around that use of technology. Discover practical ways to manage young workers’ comfort and deal with their potentially pre-existing injuries.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify the ergonomic issues that Millennials bring to the workplace
Recognize the habits from life-long technology use that will affect ergonomic evaluations
Persuade Millennials to ergonomically conform to a more structured workplace
Thursday, Nov. 17
3 - 4 p.m.

EE7 Dyslexia: What Ergonomists Need to Know

Andrew Wood, Senior Consultant/Ergonomics, Ferguson Risk Management

Intermediate

Dyslexia is a hidden disability with no visible signs or symptoms. There is no cure and individuals do not “grow out of it.” Using data from advanced brain imaging techniques Mr. Wood will explain what dyslexia is, discuss its prominence in society, and explain the neurophysiology of normal and dyslexic reading.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Recognize the prevalence of dyslexia in the population
Discuss the physiology of normal reading and abnormal reading
Provide accommodations to individuals with dyslexia
Thursday, Nov. 17
4:15 - 5:15 p.m.

EE8 Bridging the Gap Between Green Building Practices and Occupant Health

Lucy Hart, MSc, CCPE, Certified Ergonomist, Global Furniture Group
Mallory Lynch, Campus Ergonomist, University of California Berkeley   
Linda Miller, President/Senior Ergonomist, EWI Works   

Basic

Green buildings are being constructed throughout North America as a means to promote environmental sustainability. A lot of attention is being paid to the environmental impact of such buildings, but less so on the health impacts of the occupants. Hear the common concerns occupants report and how the integration of ergonomics can improve the health of computer users. You’ll also learn about the revised Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Pilot Credit 44 to support the integration of ergonomics in building design and construction.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify potential occupant health concerns related to green buildings
Identify how ergonomics can be used to address occupant needs
Use infographics and resources to apply for Pilot Credit 44
Friday, Nov. 18
9:45 - 10:45 a.m.

EE10 Ergonomics and Wellness in Labs: Improving and Sustaining Worker Performance

Todd Baker, Principal, Empowerment Ergonomics

Basic

Biological and chemical laboratories face many challenges in keeping their workers healthy and productive. Mr. Baker will share the comprehensive, multidisciplinary model he developed for addressing the physical risks associated with lab work. He’ll cover the importance of complementing ergonomics interventions with therapeutic and fitness/wellness interventions, and share innovative work environment modifications. This session is a must for lab employers seeking new ways to understand and maximize worker performance.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Confirm and prioritize risks associated with lab tasks using recognized screening tools
Use ergonomics data to identify environmental modifications and develop targeted recovery
Create low-cost fitness spaces to support ergonomics goals


Indicates the presenter is a Certified Professional Ergonomist in good standing with the Board of Certification in Professional Ergonomics (BCPE). This information is provided for reference only and does not imply endorsement of product, process or service by the BCPE. www.bcpe.org.
 
linkedin twitter faebook
ErgoExpo Expo