National Ergonomics Conference & ErgoExpo™ REGISTER AGENDASESSIONS
2015 Program Materials & Attendee List
REGISTER AGENDA
Breakout Sessions
For Agenda At-A-Glance click here.
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Tuesday, Nov. 17
9 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

WS1 The World Is Not Flat ... Controlling Workplace Risk

Drew Bossen, PT, MBA, Executive Vice President, Atlas Injury Prevention Solutions
Tony Silva, CPE, Director of Ergonomic Services, Atlas Injury Prevention Solutions

Intermediate

The Interventional Matrix concept refers to a set of intervention strategies that complement an organization’s effective ergonomics program. Drew Bossen and Tony Silva will present the case study of a U.S. manufacturer that used this approach to reduce workers’ compensation costs by 81%, including a 56% reduction in lost workday case rate. You’ll gain new tactics to help you reduce workplace injuries and control costs by using redundant and overlapping control strategies.
[ Workshop ]
takeaways
Create and interpret an Interventional Matrix
Implement a variety of strategies to prevent and reduce workplace injuries and costs
Apply Interventional Matrix strategies to large, geographically diverse organizations
Tuesday, Nov. 17
9 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

WS2 Anatomy and Physiology in the Office

Dr. Mark Vettraino, Director, TaskGroup International

Basic

It’s time to look at workstations in a whole new way! Dr. Mark Vettraino will simplify the human anatomy and explain worker discomfort. You’ll gain a firm working knowledge of posture and equipment placement, and how they relate to physical stress. You’ll also learn new posture concepts and how they reduce injury risk, as well as review sample evaluation forms and documentation procedures that will help you carry out office ergonomics evaluations within your workplace.
[ Workshop ]
takeaways
Understand anatomy and physiology of the back, neck and upper extremities
Recognize why degenerative joint disease is the most common condition among U.S. office workers
Identify red flags that will erode any ergonomics program
Tuesday, Nov. 17
9 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

WS3 Industrial Ergonomics 101: Find It, Fix It, Check for Success   Annual Favorite

Jeff Sanford, BHK, MHK, CPE, Managing Consultant, Humantech

All Levels

Industrial work environments are widely diverse; they include repetitive assembly environments, non-standard field services, distribution centers and more. Jeff Sanford will help you better understand the demands on your employees so you can evaluate their work areas and make the changes required to maintain a healthy workforce. You’ll find out how to use the “Find It, Fix It, Check for Success” approach to identify problematic job tasks, and leave with a winning formula to kick-start or update your ergonomics process.
[ Workshop ]
takeaways
Identify ergonomic risks in the industrial workplace
Know how primary risk factors contribute to work-related musculoskeletal disorders
Determine and use the appropriate tools to document ergonomic issues
Tuesday, Nov. 17
9 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

WS4 Practical Ergonomics: Finding Solutions to Fit Any Budget

Dr. Barry Carlin, CEO, Best Performance Systems

Intermediate

Every organization wants improved productivity, higher quality product and fewer injuries. But how do you do it? And how do you finance the solutions? Dr. Barry Carlin will review several concepts that will help you evaluate what needs to be improved in your workplace. Then, you’ll learn how to find an ergonomic solution — whether it’s homemade and free, or sleek and expensive. Plus, in this interactive workshop, you’ll look at pictures of worker-machine interface situations and within 20 minutes be able to determine if the worker is comfortable, what injury could arise and how to solve the issue.
[ Workshop ]
takeaways
Identify problems that affect the worker and job function
Develop practical solutions for your ergonomic challenges
Learn how to influence a worker to embrace change
Tuesday, Nov. 17
9 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

WS5 Activating Ergo Superpowers! Working With the Difficult Client

William Hood, CBES, Ergonomic Specialist, M-erg
Martha Parker, MS, CPE, Ergonomic Specialist, M-erg

Intermediate

As professionals, we’re trained to recommend the best behavioral changes and equipment to reduce risk and exposure for musculoskeletal disorders. We know the latest equipment, and have a plethora of other tools at our disposal. However, that’s not enough when we come across a “difficult client.” Each person has a story they bring to the workplace, whether it’s family issues, illness, fears, or other personal and professional factors. William Hood and Martha Parker will discuss how to get beyond the baggage to improve interactions with the difficult client.
[ Workshop ]
takeaways
Identify personality types and the traits of individuals and organizations
Explore how personal biases affect interactions with clients
Determine ways to overcome client objections to recommendations
Tuesday, Nov. 17
2 - 5:15 p.m.

WS6 Functional Movement Ergonomics for the Unpredictable 24/7 Utility Workforce

Michael Contreras, Battalion Chief, Orange County Fire Authority
Maria Silva-Palacios, MS, Safety and Environmental Safety Specialist, Southern California Edison

Intermediate

The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) approach is an understanding that every employee has unique needs, risks factors and capabilities, and that there is no “one-size-fits-all” ergonomic solution to injury prevention. Michael Contreras and Maria Silva-Palacios will discuss how to provide unprecedented levels of individual assessment to identify person-specific injury risks, as well as customized data-driven programming to improve movement quality and decrease injury risks. Using the FMS assessment will give you a reliable way to objectively measure fundamental movement patterns that are modifiable for any industry.
[ Workshop ]
takeaways
Implement the FMS approach
Analyze and interpret FMS scores
Fuse functional movement and industrial ergonomics to prevent musculoskeletal disorders
Tuesday, Nov. 17
2 - 5:15 p.m.

WS7 iHurt, uHurt, Wii All Hurt ... The Toll of Technology

Kathy Espinoza, MBA, MS, CPE, CIE, AVP, Ergonomics & Safety, Keenan & Associates

All Levels

One of last year’s highest rated sessions now expanded to a workshop! Technology has enhanced our lives, but at what cost? How does the use of cell phones, iPads, eReaders, iPods and gaming affect our health? Kathy Espinoza will share how technology can induce sleep problems, headaches, back pain, vision and hearing problems, and weight gain. She’ll discuss iPosture; Textneck; excessive sitting; Wii-itis; Nintendo Thumb; 3-D and its effect on vision, focus and concentration issues; and the compulsive need to check devices. You’ll learn how to improve the quality of life, without discarding technology.
[ Workshop ]
takeaways
Explain health trade-offs associated with excessive technology use
Adapt technology to minimize harmful effects on health
Make better choices about your habits when using technology
Tuesday, Nov. 17
2 - 5:15 p.m.

WS8 Industrial Ergonomics 201: The Job Improvement Process   Annual Favorite

Kent Hatcher, MS, CPE, Ergonomics Director and Engineer, Humantech

Intermediate

Discover the quantitative tools necessary to drive an ergonomics process based on risk assessment as well as methods to effectively enhance your job improvement process. You’ll leave with essential tools to evaluate work areas and design effective countermeasures to reduce ergonomic risk factors, while shaping a productive work environment.
[ Workshop ]
takeaways
Quantify the benefits of ergonomics in the workplace
Prioritize ergonomic issues in the workplace
Apply ergonomic design guidelines when modifying, specifying or purchasing equipment
Tuesday, Nov. 17
2 - 5:15 p.m.

WS9 Risk Factors, Risk Assessments and Your Ergonomics Program

Arun Garg, PhD, CPE, Professor of Occupational Science & Technology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Jay M. Kapellusch, PhD, Professor of Occupational Science & Technology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Intermediate

Get an in-depth look at how to set up a successful ergonomics program to improve productivity and decrease injuries, lost workdays and workers’ compensation costs. Using case studies and examples, Drs. Garg and Kapellusch will discuss evidenced-based risk factors and arm you with the knowledge to perform risk assessments for low back pain and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders.
[ Workshop ]
takeaways
Determine the essential elements of an effective ergonomics program
Understand evidenced-based risk factors for low back pain and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders
Use evidence-based job analysis methods to improve proficiency of your risk assessments for low back pain and upper limb disorders
Tuesday, Nov. 17
2 - 5:15 p.m.

WS10 Essential Ergonomics and Accommodations for an Aging Workforce   Annual Favorite

Richard Bunch, PhD, PT, CBES, CEO, ISR Institute, Inc.; Associate Clinical Professor, Tulane University Medical Center

Intermediate

Dive into the physiology of aging, and specific ergonomic and wellness interventions that can be used to reduce the risk of injury and illness among today’s aging workforce. You’ll learn how aging impacts days away from work, rate of injuries and illnesses, and medical claims. Dr. Bunch will also share methods of training and stress reduction that can help improve your employees’ mental performance and reduce errors.
[ Workshop ]
takeaways
Identify the ergonomic interventions that reduce the most prevalent injury risks related to aging
Match the physical capacities of the older worker to the job
Provide accommodations for age-related physical changes and illnesses
Wednesday, Nov. 18
8:30 - 9:30 a.m.

PM1 Reaching ROI/Metric Goals through a Multi-Faceted Process

Keith Osborne, Ergonomist, Seattle City Light

Basic

Through two case studies from Honeywell Technology Solutions Inc. and Seattle City Light, you’ll hear how utilizing a multi-faceted combination of online assessment tools, one-on-one assessments and targeted training helped cut injury rates, increase productivity and reduce potential injury claims. You’ll gain a better understanding of the importance of Ergonomics/Wellness Integration and walk away knowing how to drive performance and injury reduction through proactive process development.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Employ online tools to build metrics
Build support and management buy-in
Incorporate wellness initiatives to support the ergonomics process
Wednesday, Nov. 18
1 - 2 p.m.

PM2 Early Intervention and Ergonomics: A Blended Approach to Prevent Recordables

Tony Silva, CPE, Director of Ergonomic Services, Atlas Injury Prevention Solutions

Basic

Many organizations invest significant time and money into ergonomics programs and equipment but still fail to achieve zero recordable incidents. This is due to many factors including: an aging, unhealthy or overweight workforce; capital intensive or process-based environments where engineering controls are impossible to implement in a timely or cost-effective fashion; or employees seeking medical treatment without attempting conservative care. Tony Silva will look at two case studies where a blended approach of on-site early intervention reduced recordable incidents by using the Plan-Do-Check-Act model and ergonomics risk management and control.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Provide value-added on-site support using Kaizen methodology
Apply injury triage and other early intervention to prevent OSHA recordable incidents
Use a comprehensive inventory of job demands analyses to prevent recordable incidents
Wednesday, Nov. 18
2:15 - 3:15 p.m.

PM3 A Comprehensive Team Approach to Injury Management

Jared Cass, OTR/L, CEAS, TWD, Manager Occupational Health, Avita Health System

Intermediate

On-site services address all barriers that employees face when returning to their full-time duties, including morale. These services ensure the employee returns to an ergonomically appropriate job, the supervisor is involved in the decision-making process, and that communication and customer service is maximized. Jared Cass will explain how to make returning to work much easier by providing on-site services that cover all 3 shifts and include injury prevention and treatment, ergonomic assessments, and enhanced communication.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify the benefits of On-Site Therapy, and understand why "good enough" often is not
Demonstrate why supervisor training and customer service are important for successful injury prevention and management
Discuss why you should not be focused on the aging workforce, but rather a system-wide approach to proactive injury prevention
Wednesday, Nov. 18
4 - 5 p.m.

PM4 Rolling Out a Global Ergonomics Program

Judy Baldridge, OT, CAE, Ergonomic Consultant, PRN/Visa Inc.
Kimberly Mullineaux, MS, CSP, Global Safety Director, Visa Inc.

Intermediate

Rolling out a global ergonomics program requires extensive preparation. You’ll hear details of what works and what can go wrong from two professionals who have been through it. Kimberly Mullineaux and Judy Baldridge will discuss customs issues, product availability and the workarounds that were initiated to ensure staff was provided an equal and positive ergonomic experience. And you’ll learn how a Web-based office ergonomics training tool can be combined with telephonic consultations for day-to-day ergonomics support.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Implement key components for a global ergonomics program
Provide guidance to staff to ensure they understand the importance of ergonomics
Develop guidelines for a successful and productive rollout of a global ergonomics program
Thursday, Nov. 19
8:30 - 9:30 a.m.

PM5 PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Office Ergonomics and Reasonable Accommodation Process

Mark Winnicki, Facilities Management Leader, PricewaterhouseCoopers
Tony Silva, CPE, Director of Ergonomic Services, Atlas Injury Prevention Solutions

Intermediate

Employers with 15 employees or more need to provide reasonable accommodations to employees or applicants who are qualified individuals with disabilities. For PricewaterhouseCoopers, with a large percentage of its workforce working remotely from client and home office location, as well as hoteling stations, it made sense to take a centralized approach to managing staff-initiated reasonable accommodation requests. Hear how PwC used Six Sigma methodologies to develop and refine its successful AbilityWorks program.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Know standard practices for making requests for reasonable accommodations and purchasing ergonomic equipment
Identify ergonomic strategies for hoteling stations and working in client environments
Use process flow diagrams to document work flow
Thursday, Nov. 19
1 - 2 p.m.

PM6 Ergonomics Training With a Punch!

Michael Melnik, MS, OTR, President, Prevention Plus, Inc.

Intermediate

What makes for a great employee ergonomics presentation? It’s more complicated than simply providing facts, figures, and “before and after” pictures. These all have value, but are only powerful when the audience is engaged enough to absorb the information, and then motivated enough to use it. Come gain strategies on how to read your audience; alter your pace, volume and intensity for maximum impact; respond effectively to questions; use humor effectively; and present material in a way that not only educates, but influences and entertains.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Recognize the limitations of classroom training
Identify key elements of a powerful presentation
Integrate effective presentation strategies into your training
Thursday, Nov. 19
2:15 - 3:15 p.m.

PM7 Finding the Link Between the Job and the Injury

Allen Thompson, Director of Industrial Rehabilitation, Miss., Drayer Physical Therapy

Advanced

Causation analysis is a way to study and determine the cause of a particular injury. Understanding whether biomechanical factors or pre-existing medical conditions may or may not influence an injury assists in distinguishing how an injury occurred. So the question is: Did the injury occur because of the job or was it caused by previous disposition? Allen Thompson will demonstrate different evaluation techniques and medical association to determine the causative or non-causative effect of the work upon the employee.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Evaluate and distinguish epidemiology and causative factors
Recognize the level of certainty needed to effectively conclude the findings and suggest or dispute the injury was causatively job-related
Effectively review a causation analysis
Thursday, Nov. 19
4 - 5 p.m.

PM8 Ergonomic-Designed HSE Change Management

Steven Krile, CPE, Director HSE Systems & HR/HSE Process Improvement, Cooper Standard Automotive
Kevin Perdeaux, CPE, Senior Manager Global Ergonomics, Cooper Standard Automotive

Advanced

Many organizations use checklists, criteria, standards or other mechanisms to address HSE and ergonomics in change management processes, but their effectiveness and widespread use are often limited by format, defined process, scope, user population and/or content design. Cooper Standard used principles of user-centered design to create and process map an interactive, scalable change management tool containing HSE and ergonomics technical content. Steven Krile and Kevin Perdeaux will share the features and functions of the tool, considerations included in its design, and how it’s embedded into the organization.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Apply a macro and micro ergonomics approach to design a technical change management tool
Design a change management tool for global user requirements
Integrate a change management tool into your organization's business processes
Friday, Nov. 20
8:30 - 9:30 a.m.

PM9 Early Intervention Programs: Knowing and Understanding Your Boundaries

Drew Bossen, PT, MBA, Vice President, Atlas Injury Prevention Solutions
Curt DeWeese, PT, COO, DSI Work Solutions
Scott Ege, PT, MS, President, Ege WorkSmart Solutions, PC

Intermediate

Early intervention/injury triage programs focus on using evaluation and first aid care for early reports of pain, discomfort, and minor sprains and strains instead of a traditional physician consult. These programs are typically staffed by physical therapists or athletic trainers with advanced training in industrial care and ergonomics. Knowing what constitutes a recordable injury and OSHA’s regulations is key for understanding compliance boundaries. Drew Bossen, Curt DeWeese and Scott Ege all work within these constraints daily and will share their strategies to help you implement an early intervention program as part of your organization’s overall approach to reducing musculoskeletal disorders.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify services that can and cannot be performed under the guise of early intervention/employee triage programs
Explain how the guidelines in OSHA’s recent Letters of Explanation impact the ongoing strategy of early intervention/employee triage
Leverage an early intervention/employee triage business plan into a broader offering of services
Friday, Nov. 20
9:45 - 10:45 a.m.

PM10 Successfully Influence and Motivate Worker Behavior

Dr. Barry Carlin, CEO, Best Performance Systems

Intermediate

We have all experienced an employee not doing what is asked of them. Often it’s a matter of misunderstanding expectations, simply forgetting or the common tendency to resist something new. Dr. Barry Carlin will present a six-step proactive plan to increase the quality of functioning of your team members and assist you in motivating your staff to do what is asked of them. You’ll learn how to motivate desired behaviors, maintain new habits and help your staff bring about positive action in each other!
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify what is causing your workforce to resist compliance
Create a customized integrated system to influence your workers
Design systems to keep the new habits alive for many years
Wednesday, Nov. 18
8:30 - 9:30 a.m.

OF1 Evolving the Way We Work With Today’s Technologies

Jerome J. Congleton, PhD, PE, CPE, Emeritus Professor of Ergonomics and Safety Engineering,
Texas A&M University Health Science Center School of Public Health


Basic

Traditional workspaces are no longer the norm. Office employees are now faced with additional strains due to new technologies and changes in their work environments. Dr. Congleton will present research findings on the sit/stand concept and stand-biased workstations, including the benefits of both. Plus, you’ll learn how set-up with the proper equipment is essential to increase movement in today’s workspaces.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Apply basic ergonomic principles to new technology
Incorporate wellness into workplace design
Identify specific challenges and needs of non-traditional work environments and alternative office designs
Wednesday, Nov. 18
1 - 2 p.m.

OF2 Ergonomic Considerations for Standing Office Work

Kevin Costello, CPE, President, US Ergonomics

Intermediate

Recent warnings of health concerns related to seated and sedentary work have frightened office workers to their feet. While demands for standing work solutions have increased dramatically, many companies are struggling to justify the need while attempting to satisfy employee requests. You’ll hear all the benefits, risks and challenges of supporting a standing work solution through a summary of research, case studies and company policies to take a proactive approach to standing work requests.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Assess the need for a standing work solution and investigate alternatives
Develop an effective implementation strategy
Employ procedures to manage the stampede of standing work requests
Wednesday, Nov. 18
2:15 - 3:15 p.m.

OF3 Anatomy of Common Office Injuries and Suggestions for Resolution

Justin Hamilton, PT, DPT, OCS, Ergonomist, Kaiser Permanente
Marie Vincent, MA, Ergonomist, Kaiser Permanente

Basic

Typing and mouse use cause many musculoskeletal discomforts. But with knowledge and the proper equipment, they can be alleviated. Justin Hamilton and Marie Vincent will start by explaining the anatomy and pathology of injury for the neck, back, upper extremities and lower extremities plus indicate how to identify symptoms of common musculoskeletal disorders. Then, you’ll learn ergonomic solutions targeting each of these body parts, ranging from simple adjustments and behavioral recommendations to ergonomic equipment — so you can prevent symptoms from appearing.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify common biomechanical sources of hand, wrist, elbow and shoulder symptoms
Know the benefits of various ergonomic devices, such as keyboards, mice and negative tilt platforms
Select the right piece of equipment for identified biomechanical issues
Wednesday, Nov. 18
4 - 5 p.m.

OF4 Fit or Failure: How to Assess for Chair Quality and Competency

Alison Heller-Ono, CIE, CPE, CDA, CPDM, CMC, President/CEO, Worksite International, Inc.

Basic

If the computer is the most important tool in the office today, then the ergonomic office chair is the second. Together they help determine your employees’ productivity. The importance of seated work can’t be ignored, yet many employers fail to recognize the critical link in maximizing employee productivity with a good fitting chair. Alison Heller-Ono will show you how to objectively assess your chairs for quality and competency to determine if they are “fit for duty.” You’ll walk away with a new — and necessary — appreciation for this essential piece of office equipment.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Develop a chair inventory program to assess chair quality and competency
Understand the science behind chair fitting
Determine when a chair is at the end of its life cycle and should be removed from the office
Thursday, Nov. 19
8:30 - 9:30 a.m.

OF5 Digital Eyestrain: Seeing Is Believing

Jeffrey Anshel, OD, FAOO, Corporate Vision Consulting

Intermediate

Visual function plays a huge role in workplace productivity. By understanding the connection between visual comfort and productivity, and knowing the many options for good ergonomic workplace lighting, you’ll become sensitive to potential visual stress that can affect all areas of performance. Jeffrey Anshel will define computer vision syndrome, also known as digital eyestrain, and explain how to resolve it.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Understand the structure and function of the visual system
Recognize how the eyes interact with the work environment
Troubleshoot environmental conditions that may lead to visual stress
Thursday, Nov. 19
1 - 2 p.m.

OF6 Revisiting Sitting and Seating

Rani Lueder, MS, CPE, President, Humanics Ergonomics Inc.

Advanced

Much about what we believed regarding seating has been undermined or disputed in the last decade. Even today, many risk factors associated with sitting are poorly understood and misrepresented by a broad range of disciplines. Rani Lueder will review new research findings about sitting postures and prolonged seating, and explain the principles behind sitting postures and chair design to decrease the risk of injury.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Describe how chair design impacts the risk of injury
Identify the unique design considerations for accommodating special seat requirements
Discuss the most relevant new research on sitting postures
Thursday, Nov. 19
2:15 - 3:15 p.m.

OF7 Dual Touch and Super-Large Display Use: Placement and Posture

Ramanand D. Patel, President/Owner, Yoga and Sound
Cynthia Purvis Roe, MA, Ergonomics Consultant, M-erg

Intermediate

Dual super-large displays and dual touch/stylus displays require more neck and torso rotation than single average-sized displays. Cynthia Purvis Roe and Ramanand Patel will unveil new ergonomic research findings that identify the postures, movements and display placements that should be encouraged and avoided to keep users productive and comfortable. You’ll be guided through simple postures that can be incorporated while using dual displays, during work breaks and while exercising.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Determine placements (height, tilt, viewing distance and swivel) for dual super-large displays and dual touch/stylus displays
Explain how to rotate the neck from the base of the spine
Recommend simple yoga postures and hand gestures for dual display users
Thursday, Nov. 19
4 - 5 p.m.

OF8 Stand Up: Piloting the Future

Lance Perry, PE, CPE, Senior Ergonomics Consultant, Zurich Services Corporation
Tim Pottorff,, Senior Ergonomics Consultant, Zurich Services Corporation

Intermediate

Sit/stand workstations are the rage, but with limited research available, it’s difficult to justify the implementation. Tim Pottorff and Lance Perry will present available research and methods used to justify sit/stand workstations over traditional sedentary workstations. You’ll learn the opportunities and challenges of implementing sit/stand workstations on a wide-scale basis. Plus, hear the results of a pilot program conducted by Zurich Services Corporation, and compare those results with those from a recent study group.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Choose from different methods to cost-justify sit/stand workstations
Identify improved methods of gaining employee compliance with sit/stand workstations
Apply lessons learned from a large-scale pilot of office workstation options
Friday, Nov. 20
8:30 - 9:30 a.m.

OF9 Ergonomists: Sherlock Holmes Solving the Mystery of the Office Injury

Becky M. Dillon, PT, CEAS I/II, Kaiser Permanente – Antelope Valley

Basic

When getting to the bottom of an employee’s office injury, the smallest factors count — unfortunately, these have a tendency to be overlooked. Becky M. Dillon will pull out her magnifying glass and provide an in-depth explanation of office ergonomic risk factors, delving into their implications and possible solutions. While every ergonomics situation is different, you’ll leave knowing what clues to look for when you’re solving your own ergonomics mystery.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Recognize office ergonomic risk factors and identify the problems attributed to these factors
Mitigate individual risk factors by decreasing/eliminating their impact, applying posture/position/alignment adjustments, and implementing ergonomic gadget options
Create a cache of tools, ideas and options that can help employees avoid injury
Friday, Nov. 20
9:45 - 10:45 a.m.

OF10 Ergonomics Hot Topics — Benefits or Risks?

Paula Lewis, MS, CPE, Principal Consultant, EORM/BSI

Basic

In the news, on social media and on the web, we’re receiving mixed messages about various ergonomic solutions. So how do you determine which to implement in your organization? Paula Lewis will discuss the health benefits and risks of sitting and standing by comparing several standing solutions currently on the market, as well as the applications of treadmill and bicycle work stations. And, with a look at more of today’s common ergonomics problems, you’ll learn how to properly respond to everyday employees’ requests, such as for exercise balls as chairs, and how to implement OSHA's letter of interpretation in regard to stretching.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Choose the right sit/stand workstation option for your company
Know the benefits and risks of using forearm supports
Incorporate stretching and rest breaks into your ergonomics programs
Wednesday, Nov. 18
8:30 - 9:30 a.m.

IS1 Building Resilience to Injury to Enhance Performance

Nicholas Magana, CSCS, FMS, Safety & Environmental Specialist, Southern California Edison
Stacy Rozell, CSP, Safety & Environmental Specialist, Southern California Edison

Basic

Nicholas Magana and Stacy Rozell will provide tips on how employees should perform physically demanding tasks by optimizing their body position and applying proper body mechanics. You’ll learn about developing employee movement capabilities awareness and how to strategize work methods based on an employee’s range of motion capabilities — all of which will minimize injuries related to physical demands.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Review ways to use the body or adjust work methods to perform jobs efficiently with the least amount of effort
Identify basic body mechanics of employees
Consider workplace designs and accommodations, and how to work within and outside the performance zone
Wednesday, Nov. 18
1 - 2 p.m.

IS2 Ergonomic Field Intervention – Architect of Change

Jeff Tiedeman, Ergonomics Consultant, State Compensation Insurance Fund

Basic

Delve into risk factor identification and workplace improvement. Covering a number of different industries, from light manufacturing to agriculture to construction, you’ll be exposed to the intervention process from a consultant's perspective, including the often difficult task of persuading an employer to implement changes.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Utilize a simple cost benefit analysis to help persuade a reluctant employer to make recommended changes
Know what to do when your company agrees to your recommendations but fails to implement them
Understand why training and follow up are critical components of ergonomic intervention
Wednesday, Nov. 18
2:15 - 3:15 p.m.

IS3 The Cost of Tool Ergonomics

Raffi Elchemmas,, MBA, CPE, Tool Ergonomist, Greenlee Textron
Kevin Costello, CPE, President, US Ergonomics

Basic

Raffi Elchemmas and Kevin Costello will analyze the costs associated with ergonomic injuries. They will compare the ergonomic benefits and shortcomings of electrical and utility industry tools and teach you what to look for in an ergonomic tool evaluation. Plus, you’ll hear about expanded data using electromyography (EMG) statistics, postural analysis, grip size, muscle effort, cycle time, productivity, tool weight, balance and vibration analysis.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Evaluate the return on investment (ROI) of ergonomic tools
Apply methods for evaluating the costs and savings of implementing ergonomic tools
Explain how partnering with ergonomics tool teams can result in wins for all parties
Wednesday, Nov. 18
4 - 5 p.m.

IS4 Preventing Slips, Trips and Falls: Strategies for Identifying and Reducing Risks   Annual Favorite

Fred Norton, MS, CPE, ARM, Technical Director – Ergonomics, Liberty Mutual Insurance

Basic

Slips, trips and falls are a leading cause of injuries both at and away from the workplace. Through a combination of research and practical improvement ideas, you’ll learn strategies that have effectively reduced falls in manufacturing, service and hospitality industries. Fred Norton, who has extensive experience in fall prevention, will share insights on developing and sustaining your programs. Plus, through case studies, he’ll highlight the practical solutions that have been implemented to address facility design, housekeeping, worker engagement and management support.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Recognize the 6 factors that increase the risks of slip, trip and fall incidents
Explain how better facility design and a comprehensive fall prevention approach can reduce slip, trip and fall risks
Adapt strategies used by organizations to successfully reduce fall risks
Thursday, Nov. 19
8:30 - 9:30 a.m.

IS5 Compounding Benefits of Integrating Occupational Safety With Health Promotion

Matt Jeffs, DPT, CHC, CEAS, BTE Technologies, Inc.

Advanced

Both workplace safety factors and workforce health influences jointly contribute to many problems confronting today’s business and industry. Until recently, programs for these two areas were often fragmented. Prevailing science now supports combining these efforts through initiatives that integrate health protection and health promotion. Behavior-based safety has been field-tested, and employee participants report positive experiences with better communication and understanding between management and workers, a sense of pride, and satisfaction with learning new skills. You’ll discover the benefits of a committed willingness to listen to perspectives of front line staff, provide feedback on solutions and work together to address feasible root concern measures.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Expand Behavior-Based Safety into Behavior-Based Safety and Health to compound benefits to the employer, the workforce and marketplace viability
Implement the practice of Engagement Ergonomics
Learn how facilitating continuous improvement builds communication, morale, trust and a broader, more comprehensive discussion on what truly defines ROI
Thursday, Nov. 19
1 - 2 p.m.

IS6 The Creation of a Best in Class Ergonomics Program

Belinda Manalac, Safety Specialist, University of California, Irvine
Diana Pelletier, President/CEO, P3 Ergonomics/Pelletier & Associates

Intermediate

Hear how the University of California, Irvine designed and developed an effective program to significantly reduce employee injury rates. By melding online training and assessment tools plus offering efficient in-person and on-site assessments, the university created a robust program with an expansive reach. Belinda Manalac and Diana Pelletier will review all aspects of creating an ergonomics program, giving you guidelines, educational materials and product specification sheets to use for developing your own successful program.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify suitable collaborative partners, ergonomic products, online tools and other resources
Create an efficient request, assessment and follow-up process
Use metrics to track success and educate management about ergonomic benefits
Thursday, Nov. 19
2:15 - 3:15 p.m.

IS7 Reducing Musculoskeletal Injuries in the Cleaning Trades

Cindy Burt, MS, OTR/L, CPE, Injury Prevention Manager, Environment, Health and Safety, UCLA

Intermediate

In 2011, a focused intervention program was developed to reduce injuries for custodians, who are among the most frequently injured workers at UCLA. After 2 of every 3 injuries were determined to involve ergonomic factors, an ergonomist was assigned to provide full-time intervention services. Targeted goals included reducing tasks that involved manual materials handling and repetitive motions. Specific work tasks addressed included trash, recycling, linen handling, bathroom cleaning, mopping and vacuuming. Cindy Burt will share the successes and failures as custodial tasks were modified or eliminated. She’ll also discuss the specific challenges of integrating new equipment and work procedures into an environment with a shrinking workforce and increasing footprint.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify the best work practices to reduce ergonomic risk factors for custodians
Select automated cleaning equipment to reduce risk exposure
Integrate a sustainable ergonomics program in custodial operations and save money doing it
Thursday, Nov. 19
4 - 5 p.m.

IS8 Extreme Ergonomics as a Return-to-Work or Stay-at-Work Tool for Claim Closures

Ian Chong, MS, CPE, Extreme Ergonomics Inc.

Advanced

Extreme ergonomics (not your typical office ergonomics) is often underutilized as an effective tool for addressing and closing difficult or severe injury cases, or disability management/return-to-work scenarios. With real-case examples, out-of-the-box thinking and logical methods, Ian Chong will illustrate extreme ergonomics applications to specific return-to-work issues for musicians, industry workers, police officers, construction workers, materials handlers, utility workers and others.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Use high level ergonomic solutions to manage disability, address injuries and return employees to work
Determine logical approaches to implement high level ergonomics
Develop a vision for the significant potential of high level ergonomics
Friday, Nov. 20
8:30 - 9:30 a.m.

IS9 Mobile Computing: Surviving Computer Use in Vehicles

Arnie Neustaetter, MS, CEES, Ergonomics Manager, Pacific Gas & Electric Co.

Intermediate

Learn a systematic way to quantify ergonomic risk of in-vehicle computer use, with a look at the use of fixed mounts for laptops and tablets vs. computing without fixed mounts; alternative positioning and use of accessories to achieve comfortable computing postures; stylus, touch screen and wireless keyboard and mouse use; and more. You’ll learn a variety of computing applications with specific examples from the Utility, Public Safety and Field Service industries.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Effectively assess ergonomic risk of in-vehicle laptop/tablet use
Employ a variety of strategies to help employees achieve good postures during in-vehicles computer use
Distinguish among the various mount and accessory options available to improve postures
Friday, Nov. 20
9:45 - 10:45 a.m.

IS10 Case Study: Reducing the Risk for Field Service Technicians

Stephan Jones, Global SHE Program Manager – Ergonomics, Nalco, an Ecolab Company
Kevin Kelley, SHE Manager, Ecolab Equipment Care, Ecolab, Inc.
Scott Ege, PT, MS, President, Ege WorkSmart Solutions, PC

Intermediate

Field service work is mostly unique, making it difficult to reduce MSD risk without a comprehensive approach. Nearly half of Ecolab's field technicians engage in the repair, replacement or installation of food service preparation, water purification or pest elimination equipment, leading to the highest rates of work-related MSDs. Most of their work occurs in customer locations, presenting little opportunity to physically change the work environment. Learn how to apply Ecolab’s innovative approach — a combination of scenario-specific training, better tools and vehicle ergonomics — to protect your field service technicians.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Develop a comprehensive approach to reduce MSD risks to field service workers
Target training and learning experiences to seasoned field technicians to maximize retention and change behaviors
Explain the necessity of specific job function descriptions and the ability to return workers to the job quickly and safely
Wednesday, Nov. 18
8:30 - 9:30 a.m.

MH1 The Missing Element of Lean Manufacturing

Dr. Barry Carlin, CEO, Best Performance Systems

Intermediate

Lean usually applies to equipment and process, ignoring the human. Dr. Barry Carlin will introduce a three-step system used by a manufacturer to reduce injury costs from $3 million to $1.3 million over an 11-month period and cut waste from $6 million to $2 million. You’ll learn a complete, practical program to evaluate, create, implement and maintain a customized injury prevention/productivity enhancement program for any organization.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Adjust tools, equipment and body mechanics for the physical demands of job tasks
Effectively communicate with workers, supervisors and management
Integrate new habits into the corporate culture
Wednesday, Nov. 18
1 - 2 p.m.

MH2 Ergonomic Enhancements Leading to Productivity Improvements

Chris Shieldsmith, MS, Corporate Ergonomist, Cummins Inc.

Intermediate

Chris Shieldsmith will discuss an assembly line project that led to improved throughput using ergonomic enhancements to reduce operator risk and improve operator comfort. You will learn the Six Sigma methodologies and ergonomic analysis techniques used, plus get details on all of Cummins’ ergonomic improvements that resulted in higher efficiency.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify the best ergonomic improvements for assembly lines
Improve safety and operator comfort while also improving manufacturing line efficiency
Recognize which Six Sigma tools can be used to drive an industrial ergonomics project
Wednesday, Nov. 18
2:15 - 3:15 p.m.

MH3 Framework for Success: Launching an Ergonomics Initiative at a Sawmill

Maggie Vaughan, Ergonomics Specialist, J.D. Irving, Ltd.
Kent Hatcher, MS, CPE, Ergonomics Director and Engineer, Humantech

Intermediate

Maggie Vaughan and Kent Hatcher will share their approach, elements, experiences and lessons learned while deploying an ergonomics process within J.D. Irving’s Sawmills Division in Eastern Canada. You will learn how to overcome barriers to change and review specifics, such as identifying direct causes, feasible engineering design improvements and measurable results of reducing ergonomic risks.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Design and deploy an improvement process that aligns with your organization’s culture
Understand the importance of an established common set of tools and expectations
Develop a comprehensive process for identifying and reducing ergonomic risk factors
Wednesday, Nov. 18
4 - 5 p.m.

MH4 A Model for Rapid Effective Ergonomics Intervention

Zachery Collins, MS, MOT/L, CPE, Senior Ergonomics Consultant, Bureau Veritas

Basic

Frustrated at the slow pace of implementing ergonomics solutions? Tired of getting tied up in long-term planning, capital expense and multiple meetings that fail to satisfy internal customers? Zachery Collins will share a proven model for you to consider. It’s fit for a variety of ergonomics risk factors and eases the process, providing an effective, focused and rapid ergonomics intervention strategy to mitigate lifting-related issues. You’ll learn about a program deployed in a Fortune 100 company to evaluate and eliminate long-term high risk manual material handling. More than 65% of the solutions identified were implemented within 30 days — all for under $1000.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Engage manufacturing shop floor employees in problem solving and solution implementation
Avoid pitfalls and ensure program success
Develop a process to enhance communication with leadership and grow ergonomics culture
Thursday, Nov. 19
8:30 - 9:30 a.m.

MH5 Avoiding Common Ergonomics Pitfalls

Tim Pottorff, Senior Ergonomics Consultant, Zurich Services Corporation

Intermediate

Take a look at a novel approach to risk factor identification, using simple techniques to identify postural risk factors to which employees may be exposed. Tim Pottorff will review ergonomic hazards, pinpointing postural risk factors and their effects on the body. You’ll learn methods to easily identify hazards, as well as how to help individual employees identify postural risk factors.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Recognize the most common ergonomics hazards
Identify successful solutions to common postural risk factors
Use available technology to document risk factors and improve the chances for successful mitigation
Thursday, Nov. 19
1 - 2 p.m.

MH6 The Global Edge: Adapting Ergonomics for the Digital Age

Chris Arteberry, CPE, Manager, Ergonomics, Bureau Veritas North America
Jeanne Guerin, Senior Ergonomist, Bureau Veritas North America

Intermediate

Explore the use of hi-tech, cost-effective solutions to address ergonomic design concerns for high-risk jobs at multi-site and international organizations. How can an ergonomics team that relies on a “hands-on” approach adapt its methodologies to remain relevant and effective on a global scale? Chris Arteberry and Jeanne Guerin will focus on material handling processes plus the use of remote technologies in the design and redesign of office workspaces for different user populations. You’ll learn the importance of modifying traditional “high-touch” ergonomic risk assessment and solution implementation methods to meet the fast-paced, low-cost demands of manufacturing environments.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify current technologies available to assist ergonomics teams in supporting remote sites, including HD video capture, cloudbased solutions and Human Modeling software
Use virtual technologies to sell ergonomics to key stakeholders
Develop a standardized ergonomics improvement process to address remote material handling concerns
Thursday, Nov. 19
2:15 - 3:15 p.m.

MH7 Is It Carpal Tunnel Syndrome? Maybe Not

Lance Perry, PE, CPE, Senior Ergonomist/Professional Engineer, Zurich Services Corporation

Intermediate

In many cases patients diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome receive medical treatment, perform months of therapy and sometimes undergo surgery — yet their conditions do not improve. Why? Often it’s the result of a quick diagnosis of CTS where the patient barely receives a physical exam and the main indicators are the minimal symptoms of numbness and tingling in the hands. Lance Perry will teach you about multiple upper extremity neuro-impingements that can produce some degree of hand and finger pain, tingling and numbness and can closely mimic symptoms of CTS that often leads to misdiagnosis.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Know the anatomy and etiology of CTS
Identify various phantoms to CTS and why misdiagnoses can happen
Recognize how the decisions employees make throughout the day greatly influence whether or not they develop CTS
Thursday, Nov. 19
4 - 5 p.m.

MH8 Empowering Employees and Advancing the Ergonomics Process

Melissa Fish, CAE, ATC/L, Corporate Ergonomics Lead, Quad/Graphics
Blake McGowan, MS, CPE, Managing Consultant, Humantech

Intermediate

The Quad/Graphics leadership team promotes a culture where employees are encouraged to think and act like business owners to innovate solutions. And with the right tools, technology and knowledge to advance the ergonomics process, employees are empowered. Melissa Fish and Blake McGowan will share key learnings of their ergonomics process, strategies used to target focus areas, and how the use of web-based trainings and an online management system has saved time and resources. You’ll learn how design standards were used to develop risk mitigation projects and how they were deployed at multiple locations.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Gain management support for ergonomics and increase department-level ownership
Empower, engage and develop employees with skills and knowledge to advance the ergonomics process
Identify methods for planning, monitoring and tracking progress
Friday, Nov. 20
8:30 - 9:30 a.m.

MH9 How Do You Change Behavior if Your Employees Don't Understand You?

Denise Vladovich, Owner, Market Solutions Consulting

Basic

Low literacy can lead to increased risk of injury, difficulty in following processes, decreased productivity and employee frustration. Today, 50% of adults can’t read a book written at an 8th grade level, and 36% of Americans have difficulty understanding basic health information. Yet, many companies provide information about ergonomics, health and safety in a format many employees simply cannot understand. Through videos, Denise Vladovich will show you the challenges faced by those with low literacy and provide you with techniques for identifying employees who may have problems with literacy.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Develop an ergonomics networking system adaptable to any community
Identify 10 simple ways to improve comprehension in written materials, especially with an aging workforce
Learn 7 tips to use for effective communication to enhance ergonomic education
Friday, Nov. 20
9:45 - 10:45 a.m.

MH10 Materials Handling: Preventing Injuries Through Pre-Hire Physical Abilities Testing

Deborah Lechner, PT, MS, President, ErgoScience

Intermediate

Post Offer Agility Testing is an important component in creating a defensible approach to hiring employees who are capable of performing the job. Agility tests that examine the worker’s ability to perform the job tasks are more effective for decreasing injuries than medical exams and the self-reporting of previous conditions. Deborah Lechner will cover these issues related to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act (ADAAA) that you should consider to avoid legal problems.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Recognize the benefits of pre-hire functional screening and the qualities of defensible testing
Identify federal and regulatory issues related to functional screening
Learn the specific steps for developing a defensible functional screening process
Wednesday, Nov. 18
8:30 - 9:30 a.m.

AW1 Inclusion Ergonomics for the Differently Abled Workforce

Kathy Espinoza, MBA, MS, CPE, CIE, AVP, Ergonomics & Safety, Keenan & Associates

Basic

As the percentage of aging workers continues to increase, the probability that our aging workers will be diagnosed with diseases that affect their ability to produce and function will also increase. Inclusion ergonomics aims to retain the wealth of knowledge possessed by an aging and differently abled workforce by ergonomically accommodating these individuals. Kathy Espinoza will share how inclusive ergonomics will help you attract and retain the best workforce, as you learn how to design work environments to mitigate or reduce disability.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Describe the importance of creating adjustable, accessible work areas
Deliver accommodations for employees with low vision, fibromyalgia, arthritis, Crohn's disease, diabetes, ALS and more
Reduce barriers and find processes to improve productivity and reduce injuries
Wednesday, Nov. 18
1 - 2 p.m.

AW2 Health & Wellness: Keys to a Successful Workforce

Jerome J. Congleton, PhD, PE, CPE, Emeritus Professor of Ergonomics and Safety Engineering, Texas A&M University Health Science Center School of Public Health

Basic

Health and wellness are at the forefront of today’s public interest. Incorporating this high profile initiative into the workplace allows employees to use their working hours towards increasing overall health, rather than hindering it. It also provides employers the opportunity to increase employee productivity while decreasing overhead costs due to insurance and time-off. Dr. Congleton will share an introduction to health and wellness in the workplace, provide ergonomic insights into the latest research and show practical ways that ergonomics can positively impact a diverse workforce.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Know the benefits of health and wellness programs in a workplace environment
Summarize the impact of implementing wellness initiatives on both the employer and employee
Integrate wellness into workplace design
Wednesday, Nov. 18
2:15 - 3:15 p.m.

AW3 Harmful Age-Related Work Postures in a Sedentary World

Richard Bunch, PhD, PT, CBES, CEO, ISR Institute, Inc.; Associate Clinical Professor, Tulane University Medical Center

Intermediate

The impact of work-related static postures and sedentary work on health as we age has gained more attention in recent years from OSHA. The long-term cumulative effects of certain postures on employees in the office and field can cause serious damage to the body in the form of sprains, strains, bone spurs, herniated discs and, in certain cases, even increase the risk for deadly strokes. Sedentary work has contributed to increasing cases of obesity and obesity-related diseases. Based on his 38 years of experience as an ergonomic specialist and clinician, Dr. Bunch will share how poor static postures and being sedentary are affecting health nationally. You’ll leave knowing the consequences of ergonomic and behavioral-based changes through education and motivation of people being assessed at the job.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify the optimum posture for sitting and standing and how it relates to age and age-related medical conditions
Recognize how cumulative trauma mechanisms lead to pathology from poor postures and being sedentary
Perform an effective postural assessment and incorporate appropriate ergonomic interventions for seated and standing work
Wednesday, Nov. 18
4 - 5 p.m.

AW4 Core Competencies for a Technician Level Ergonomics Practitioner

David Brodie, MS, CPE, Corporate Ergonomist, Cargill, Inc.
Rachel Michael, MS, CPE, Ergonomics Practice Thought Leadership, Aon Global Risk Consulting

Basic

Find out the results of a field survey administered by the Ergonomics Practice Specialty Group within the American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE) looking to define competency requirements and skill validation for a technician level practitioner of ergonomics. Rachel Michael and David Brodie will describe the scope of survey, methodology and results.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Recognize what is meant by the concept of competency
Explain what the full range of core competencies should include
Identify training opportunities for practitioners to improve their knowledge and skill base
Thursday, Nov. 19
8:30 - 9:30 a.m.

AW5 Evaluating Push-Pull Forces in Healthcare: A Unique Approach to Empowering Nurses

Terry Fisk, Non-Clinical Loss Control Director, Trinity Health System
Jeff Sanford, BHK, MHK, CPE, Managing Consultant, Humantech

Intermediate

For several years, safe patient handling has been the top priority in healthcare ergonomics and several advances in equipment and training methods have been made. Taking it a step further, the Trinity Health System decided to fully educate its nursing staff on the risks associated with pushing and pulling tasks. Jeff Sanford and Terry Fisk will describe the unique process that the Trinity Health Loss Control staff used to collect over 1,000 data points across 17 hospitals. You’ll hear the reasoning behind this important initiative along with the expected outcomes.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Distinguish the musculoskeletal disorder risks associated with patient handling and manual material handling
Use data to empower nurses and reduce the chance of a potential debilitating injury
Justify patient lifting and movement equipment as well as more standard manual materials handling equipment
Thursday, Nov. 19
1 - 2 p.m.

AW6 Implementing Electronic Medical Record Systems in the Exam Room and Beyond

Cindy Burt, MS, OTR/L, CPE, Injury Prevention Manager, Environment, Health and Safety, UCLA
Jennifer Mempin, Injury Prevention Program Manager, UCLA Health System Safety Department
Michael Ozamoto, CEAS, Safety Specialist, Environment, Health and Safety, UCLA

Intermediate

Electronic medical records serve many needs: They help doctors and medical providers keep track of their patients’ information; they provide staff immediate access; and they are retrieved by financial support staff ensuring timely and accurate billing. UCLA Health System’s electronic medical records system ties 300,000 patients to more than 4,000 medical and support personnel resulting in an ever-growing demand for ergonomic interventions in both clinical and administrative settings. UCLA ergonomists will share the ergonomic challenges they encountered while implementing its system in clinical and office settings.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Explain how clinic and office design affect employees’ risk exposure to overuse injuries
Identify the unique challenges in transitioning an existing workforce from paper to electronic medical records
Select equipment for workstations used in clinical and support spaces
Thursday, Nov. 19
2:15 - 3:15 p.m.

AW7 21st Century Healthcare Urgently Needs Ergonomics

Alan Hedge, PhD, CPE, C.Erg.HF, Professor of Ergonomics, Cornell University

Intermediate

Healthcare is increasingly technologically intensive. Yet in spite of technology advances, too little attention is paid to the performance and well-being of healthcare providers. Healthcare environments are complex systems that involve a wide array of professionals, from custodians and technicians to nurses and doctors. Ergonomic strategies for optimizing the healthcare system include designs to reduce medical errors, streamline workflows, enhance technologies, improve environments, and safeguard the health and well-being of medical professionals. Dr. Alan Hedge will show you how ergonomics can contribute to improving the design of hospitals, healthcare technologies and work practices.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Understand how ignorance of ergonomics is costing lives through unnecessary medical errors, suboptimal workflows and poor facilities design
Explain why ergonomics should be an integral part of all healthcare technology and facilities design decisions
Identify opportunities for ergonomic products and solutions in healthcare settings
Thursday, Nov. 19
4 - 5 p.m.

AW8 Preventing and Reducing Ergonomic Soft Tissue Injuries in the Workplace

Mathew Gahm, Global Wellness Solutions Executive, A.R.T. Corporate Solutions

Intermediate

Soft tissue musculoskeletal injuries are a leading cause of OSHA recordables and workers’ compensation claims across a broad range of industries. Mathew Gahm will share statistics, charts and graphs to show just how pervasive the problem is and then explore possible solutions. You’ll gain more knowledge about these types of conditions and the possible health and wellness solutions to prevent them and reduce costs.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Identify the risks of soft tissue hazards
Implement steps to make your workplace safer
Explain the pros and cons of the options available to address and prevent soft tissue injuries
Friday, Nov. 20
8:30 - 9:30 a.m.

AW9 When They Say They Can or Can't — Can They?

Connie Miller, Vice President, BTE Workforce Solutions

Intermediate

Determining whether an employee can do required job tasks can be tricky, as an objective evaluation of task performance can be difficult to obtain. Employees themselves may not have a reliable assessment of whether they can or can’t perform job tasks. How does the ergonomic process fit with employees returning to work and how does it engage them? These questions consistently challenge employers as they attempt to comply with federal guidelines in returning employees to work from paid or unpaid leave due to injury or illness. Connie Miller will outline how to generate safe and productive decisions that comply with regulations and provide you with the foundation for maximizing productivity and minimizing time away from work.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Know the physician’s role when objective decision support is the foundation to an employee returning to work
Employ a job match process that compares demonstrated ability to task demands
Explain how objective measures better support the ergonomic process
Friday, Nov. 20
9:45 - 10:45 a.m.

AW10 Make Safety Training More Effective: Getting Past the Obstacles to Change

Dr. Andrew Murro, DC, DABCO, President, Business Health Resources, LLC

Intermediate

Most employers understand that employee body mechanics contribute to the risks of cumulative trauma injuries and related conditions. Unfortunately, traditional training approaches aren’t very successful, with frustrated employers concluding that “nobody changes” or “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks.” But often, it’s not the individual causing the lack of improvement, it’s the training approach. Dr. Andrew Murro will help safety personnel and trainers to identify, understand and overcome many of the commonly overlooked obstacles to change.
[ Session ]
takeaways
Improve training programs addressing soft tissue injuries
Understand what is needed for successful programs to change working habits of employees
Create sustainable and long-lasting changes to work habits
 
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